HOW TO FIX A FLAT BIKE TIRE [COMPLETE GUIDE]

In this article we will learn How to fix a flat Bike tire. If you know what you’re doing, changing a bike tire after a flat is simple. It’ll happen sooner or later, whether you’re riding on smooth pavement, bumpy gravel, or rocky single-track trails.

See Also: Learn Bike Assembly On Your Own – Complete Guide

How To Fix A Flat Bike Tire

Arm yourself with the tools and information you’ll need to repair the problem.

Remove the Wheel

First, remove the tyre. Keep your bike upright and move your drivetrain into the toughest gear if it’s a rear-wheel flat. You may also need to release the brake on your bike if it has rim brakes. Position yourself on the non-drive side of your bike (opposite the chain) and remove the wheel by either opening the quick release or unthreading the thru-axle.

remove wheel
remove wheel

You may now take the tyre off. To dislodge the tyre, hook the rounded end of one tyre lever beneath the bead (outside edge). To keep the lever in place and prevent the unseated tyre from popping back into the rim, attach the other end to a spoke.

open lever brake
open lever brake

Hook the second lever under the bead adjacent to the first and pull it clockwise around the rim until one side of the tyre comes off.

remove wheel 1
remove wheel

The tyre does not have to be entirely removed. The Culprit must be apprehended. Pull out the old tube (if applicable) and check for the source of the flat, which might be a thorn, a piece of glass, or another sharp object once the tyre is loose.

Click on to know how to remove rear wheel. 

Make sure nothing sharp is left behind

When you run your fingertips over the inside of your tyre and rim Make sure nothing sharp is left behind. Otherwise, you risk suffering another flat. Examine the tire’s exterior as well, looking for any foreign objects that may have been lodged in the rubber. Pump some air into the old tube. It will help to discover the leak if you’re using tubes and want to perform some detective work.

check cause of the problem
check cause of the problem

A pinch-flat is indicated by two holes next to each other, indicating that the tube is squeezed between the tyre and the rim. If your flat has a single hole, it was most likely created by a sharp item. You may double-check the hole region by aligning the tube up with the tyre and using the valve as a point of reference.

In the next segment of “How to fix a flat bike tire,” we will learn to patch the tube. So, follow these steps precisely.

Patch the Problem

You can patch your tube with a patch kit if you’re the economic kind that loves to reuse old tubes or if you’ve had many flats on your ride and don’t have any spares. Skip to the following section if you have a new tube. Cleaning the pierced area and roughing up the surface with an emery cloth is the first step.

clean the area
clean the area

Simply put it over the hole and push firmly for a glue less repair. Apply a small coating of glue to the tube. And patch for a glue-required patch. Allow the adhesive to get tacky before applying the patch and pressing it down hard until it sticks. Set up the Tube Now, just enough to retain its shape, inflate your fresh or patched tube.

spread the glue
spread the glue

This makes putting it into the tyre a lot simpler. After that, place the tube inside the tyre with the valve stem straight through the rim’s valve hole. By rolling the bead away from yourself, roll the tyre back onto the rim with your hands. If you use levers to reseat the tyre, you run the risk of puncturing your new tube.

apply the tube patch
apply the tube patch

Reinstall the Wheel

partially inflate
partially inflate

Tuck both sides of the tyre bead deep into the rim when you get to the valve stem. And press upward on the stem to get the tube into the tyre. Replace the Wheel.

insert
insert

Reattach your wheel, ensuring sure the quick release or thru-axle lever is on the other side of your powertrain if everything appears fine. If your back wheel is flat, wrap the top of the chain over the cassette’s smallest gear and gently press the wheel back into the frame.

now inflate
now inflate

Close your quick release (and rim brakes if you have them) or thread the thru-axle back into the frame and hub. Finally, raise the rear wheel and spin the cranks one more to double-check that everything is back in position and working properly.

now re-install the wheel
now re-install the wheel

Get back on your bike and enjoy the rest of your journey if everything is in order.

Or Plug a Tubeless Tire

You wouldn’t have looked for “How to fix a flat bike tire” if there wasn’t any tube that would get damage. You can simply use a tubeless tire.

Alternatively, you can plug a tubeless tyre. Check your sealant regularly (every three to six months) to ensure that the tyre has enough and hasn’t dried out. However, in the event of a larger puncture or side-wall tear, a tyre plug may be required to prevent air loss. Fill kits include a tiny piece of rubber and an insertion mechanism that allows you to plug the hole without taking the tyre off.

tubeless tire
tubeless tire

Re-inflate your tyre to the proper pressure once you’ve found the puncture. And inserted the rubber plug to ensure it’s retaining air. If that’s the case, go back on the bike and inspect the repair now and then to make sure it’s holding up. You may alternatively use additional sealant, but you’ll need a valve core removal tool and a small container of sealant with you.

Conclusion

Now you can fix your flat tire and are good to go. But, remember, In the event of major breakdowns during a self-guided bike tour, call the tour operator for instructions on getting to the next town or bike repair shop.

I think this article “How to fix a flat Bike tire” will be very useful for those who have a bicycle and fix it by there self.

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